Engineering Courses

Traffic Engineering Courses

Overview of Traffic Engineering courses

Tech Transfer has been providing professional development courses in Traffic Engineering and related subjects for the last several decades. It all started with Fundamentals of Traffic Engineering (TE-01), which is now a staple course for anyone wishing to enter this highly-specialized field. We have added many courses through the years to reflect the dynamic growth of this ever-expanding field, including safety for various modes of travel, context-sensitive solutions, complete streets, advanced signal technology, and the use of VMT as a metric for environmental analysis in California, among many others. Tech Transfer has been in the forefront of providing critical training needed to comply with the newest and latest State legislation and policy guidelines in California, with SB-743 just to name a recent one.

We routinely update our training courses to reflect latest standards and technical references used in professional practice. Whenever you need the latest update on the CA MUTCD, or Caltrans Highway Design Manual, or the Highway Capacity Manual, among many others, you can rely on Tech Transfer to get the training that you need to help you fulfill your current and future job responsibilities.

Engineering Course Catalog

To learn more about a specific course click the title below. To see all the engineering courses currently open for enrollment, click here.

AV-12 Airport Systems Planning and Design (Annual Short Course)

This course grants 2.8 CEUs and will soon be approved for 28.5 AICP CM credits (AICP credits pending approval)

Description

The course is being offered in association with the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research (NEXTOR).

This five-day course offers an overview of airport planning and design for those entering or wishing to become more familiar with the field, as well as an opportunity for those with more experience to expand their knowledge of specific topics. The course is taught by some of the leading practitioners (and most experienced instructors) in the industry. In addition to covering the fundamentals of airport planning and design, the course presents emerging issues and the latest trends facing airport planners, operators, and consultants in the US and around the world. The topics covered range from airport and airline economics and travel demand forecasting to airport capacity analysis, noise analysis, and environmental planning. Topics covered also include airfield design, passenger terminal planning, airport ground access, and air cargo facilities planning.

Intended Audience

This course in intended for engineers and planners working for airport authorities, consultants, and government agencies, as well as airport and airline management personnel interested in the technical considerations that need to be taken into account in planning airport development. It will also be of interest to those involved in teaching transportation engineering courses or undertaking research on airport-related topics.

For Questions about Course Content

Contact Geoff Gosling, the course coordinator, at 510-528-8741 orgdgosling@aol.com

For more information including the course agenda and hotel information please go to the NEXTOR website.

IDM-01 Geometric Design for California

Description

This 3-day course covers the principles and best practices of roadway geometric design for various functional classes of roadways, including local streets, arterials and freeways, intersections and interchanges. This course focuses on practical, real world applications of geometric design methods. Developed with professionals in California in mind, the course will use design standards and guidelines in the Caltrans Highway Design Manual, the AASHTO "Greenbook," and other materials as appropriate. In addition to the geometric design focus, this course also addresses topics related to successful design and re-design practices in California, including stage construction, traffic handling, value analysis, context sensitive approach, owners to designers, etc. This fast-paced, hands-on course combines presentations, case-study examples, problem-solving and class exercises, with ample opportunity for networking and questions. 

Topics covered

  • overview of roadway components and traffic operation
  • sight distances
  • horizontal and vertical curves
  • superelevation
  • transitions
  • cross section elements
  • clearances
  • overcrossing layout
  • intersection design
  • interchange design
  • pedestrian and bicycle considerations
  • traffic calming strategies
  • truck and bus vehicle accommodations

What you will learn

Students will become well versed in the principles and best practices of geometric design for various functional classes of California roadway systems, including external factors that affect the geometric design decisions.

Who should attend

This class is intended for roadway design engineers and technicians who have some basic prior knowledge of or experience with geometric design, as well as for those more experienced who seek a refresher course.

Requirements

Participants will need a pencil, pen, engineer's scale, and a calculator to complete the in-class problem sets.

IDM-23 Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) Methodology for Bridges

Description

California agencies are required to adopt the AASHTO load-and-resistance factor design (LRFD) specifications plus the California Amendments for design of all new bridges. 
This 2-day course provides practical training to bridge design engineers and technicians on the application of the AASHTO LRFD specifications plus the California Amendments to the design of concrete bridges that are common in California (cast-in place box girdle, slab, pre-cast, and box culvert bridges). 
All structural components of bridges are covered; but retaining walls and the geotechnical design of deep foundations are not. This course emphasizes various technical design aspects that are affected by the newly adopted LRFD bridge design specifications plus the California Amendments, so that a more uniform level of safety for bridges can be achieved. 
This course is a hands-on training that combines lectures, class exercises on real-world bridge design problems, class discussions, and Q&A. Various bridge design examples utilizing the new LRFD specifications plus California Amendments are highlighted throughout the training.

Topics covered

  • Changes in bridge design specifications relative to existing specifications
  • LRFD design approach
  • limit states (serviceability, strength, extreme condition, and fatigue & fracture limit states)
  • permanent and live loading
  • live load distribution
  • structure analysis
  • concrete design (flexure, shear, strut and tie models)
  • pre-stressed concrete
  • design problems and examples

Who should attend

This course is designed for bridge engineers and technicians from California agencies and the private sector, who wish to understand how the LRFD specifications achieve a uniform and accepted level of bridge safety, and how to appropriately use the LRFD specifications plus the California Amendments for bridge design.

Requirements

Students should bring a calculator and pencil for in class problems.

PD-02 Construction Inspection of Traffic Signals

Description

Traffic signal projects must comply with specifications as required by the Caltrans Standard Plans and Specifications Manual. Inferior work on signals or inadequate traffic management during project construction can create potentially dangerous conditions with liability impacts for local agencies. This one-day course provides training on best practices for the management and construction inspection of these systems, including examinations of wires, cables, signal heads, and pedestrian/vehicle detectors.

Topics covered

  • pre-construction activities
  • electrical service installation
  • standards for pedestals and posts, bonding and grounding
  • conduit, pull boxes, traffic signal heads and appurtenances, detectors
  • signal controller assemblies
  • maintenance and salvage

What you will learn

Students learn how to manage field construction inspections of traffic signals and components in accordance with Caltrans' Standards Plans and Specifications Manual. Students also learn how to avoid the consequences of inferior or inadequate project management or construction.

Who should attend

This class is intended for inspectors, designers, maintenance supervisors, electricians, and other public agency personnel with responsibilities related to construction or installation of traffic signals.

PL-11 Complete Streets Planning and Design

Description

Complete Streets are planned, designed, operated, and maintained to provide safe and comfortable travel for all users of all ages. Complete Streets provide for all modes of transportation, including pedestrians, bicyclists, transit vehicles, and motorists, as well as allow for emergency response, road maintenance, and goods movement. This course covers the planning and design of Complete Streets, including the history of Complete Streets; the policy environment for Complete Streets, particularly in the California legislative environment; how to integrate Complete Streets with the urban planning process; and how to design streets, intersections, crossings, and interchanges consistent with the Complete Streets approach.

Topics covered

  • the history of Complete Streets
  • the policy environment for Complete Streets
  • new planning trends affecting decisions regarding transportation
  • integrating Complete Streets with general plans, specific plans, RTPs, TIPs, and the entitlement process
  • layered networks
  • design manuals and guidelines relevant to Complete Streets
  • cross-section element design: travel lanes, parking, shoulders, pedestrian facilities, bicycle facilities
  • experimental and innovative bikeway design
  • signalized intersection and uncontrolled crossing design

Who should attend

Students will gain an understanding of the Complete Streets approach and its application to planning and design. Students will learn how to plan for future Complete Streets as well as how to retrofit existing streets to provide for all modes of transportation. Additionally, students will learn how to evaluate complicated trade-offs between modes of transportation.

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for urban planners and transportation engineers at local, regional, and state agencies as well as consultants. Both new and experienced planners and engineers will benefit. The course is primarily appropriate for urban perspectives; however, it will address Complete Streets in rural environments as well.

PL-14 Transportation Planning Fundamentals for California Streets

Description

In today's environment, local streets and roads need to be planned, designed, built or retrofitted, operated, and maintained to provide safe, comfortable, and environmentally sustainable travel for all users of all ages and differing levels of mobility. Ideally these local streets and roads should provide for all modes, including walking, bicycling, taking transit, and driving. Local streets and roads must be operationally functional to allow for emergency response, road maintenance, and overall truck movement of goods.

This course covers the planning and conceptual design of sustainable, multimodal, local streets and roads; the history of multimodal surface transportation planning in the US; the policy environment for sustainable, multimodal transportation; how to integrate multimodal transportation into the local urban planning process; and how to design local streets, intersections, crossings, and interchanges consistent with the sustainable, multimodal approach. The course's discussion of the legislative environment is focused on California. The course spans the full range of key areas from characteristics of the local roadway system, analysis of flow and capacity, traffic/transportation operations, traffic control devices, pedestrian/bicycle facilities, and surface transit operations to traffic safety and advanced analytical methods.

The course is taught by a team of professional engineers and planners who practice in the private and public sectors with a collective experience exceeding 100 years. Key learning concepts to be highlighted throughout the three days of intensive training include: managing conflict between/among surface modes, striving for a balanced approach to promoting multiple modes along the same right-of-way (ROW) or crossing each other, promoting safety between modes and for each mode on local streets and roads, options for separating or prioritizing modes in layered networks, planning for multimodal travel at the local level wherever possible, managing multimodal transportation operations efficiently, promoting economic development and livability (in addition to access and mobility), and the best practices in multimodal surface transportation infrastructure planning and sustainable land development for livability.

Topics covered

  • The Multimodal Transportation Planning Process and Legal Framework
  • Data Collection, Quantitative Analysis, and Travel Forecasts
  • Environmental Analysis and CEQA New Trends (SB 743)
  • Evaluation and Prioritization of Multimodal Transportation Projects
  • Public Participation & Involvement, Dealing with Controversy
  • Freeway Multimodal Considerations
  • The New Transit/Multimodal Role for Arterials and Collectors
  • Multimodal Traffic Signals
  • Pedestrians and ADA Accommodations: It's the Law
  • Pedestrian Safety and Economic Development
  • Residential Streets: Livability and Quality of Life
  • Multimodal Auditing Techniques and Walking Tour
  • On-Street Bicycling and Ensuring Bicycle Safety
  • Bicycle Paths: Putting it All Together
  • Surface Mass Transit Planning Concepts
  • Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) & Light Rail Transit (LRT) Design Elements and Issues

What you will learn

Attendees will gain an understanding and appreciation of the necessary balance of all surface modes in building, operating and maintaining a functional and multi-modal infrastructure. Multi-modal streets that make effective and efficient use of rights-of-way represent an essential framework for developing and maintaining vital urban and suburban centers and neighborhoods. Trainees will learn the planning role of multimodal surface transportation in the U.S. today, and the processes that are used to achieve planning objectives, including how data is collected and used in multimodal transportation analyses. Attendees will gain an understanding of how regional plans and forecasts affect local land use and transportation plans. They will also learn how environmental analyses and public participation fit within the multimodal transportation planning process, including key impacts on existing networks, legal requirements, and how to resolve conflicts of multimodal transportation projects. In addition, attendees will:

  • Learn the basic principles for highway operations in California, the latest innovations of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) in freeway multimodal functions, and how to relate regional travel pricing policies to successful multimodal operations (e.g., Bay Area)
  • Learn about parallel relationships of multimodal measures on arterial and collector streets for proper freeway operation and multimodal interactions, as they meet over critical junctions such as signalized intersections
  • Learn a full range of treatments for pedestrian and bicycle movement in urban and suburban communities alongside a successful movement of vehicles, including bus priority considerations and success stories throughout the state and nation, with a focus on available tools and design techniques in harmony with the complete streets concepts
  • Learn about the effects of parking considerations as well as innovative pricing programs (e.g., SF Park) and how they influence modal choice and healthy economic development
  • Learn the key design and operational strategies to improve the safety and mobility of bicyclists in a multimodal environment and gain an understanding of which bikeway design options are appropriate for land use contexts in the state
  • Learn how the various transit modes are essential components of well-planned communities from big cities, such as Los Angeles and San Francisco, to suburban municipalities to small towns
  • Learn key planning, design, and operational elements pertaining to LRT and BRT in a multimodal operational environment (e.g., Gold Line LRT, Van Ness BRT)
  • Learn how to better integrate public transit modes with each other, with other modes of surface transportation, and with land use; and the role of the state's metropolitan regions and local governments in this integration

This course is cross-listed as TE-40 Multimodal Transportation Planning and Engineering

Who should attend

This course is intended for local (i.e., cities and counties) urban planners, transportation planners, and planning technicians, as well as transportation and land use consultants. Both new and experienced planners will benefit from this course. The course is primarily appropriate for urban and suburban perspectives, but may be relevant to rural areas that are subject to urban growth challenges.

PL-60 Bus Rapid Transit: Planning, Design, and Operations (online)

Description

Bus rapid transit (BRT) is an adaptable, cost-effective mode of public transportation suitable for deployment in both larger and smaller cities worldwide. The optimal BRT functions like light rail transit, but on existing streets as a premium express urban bus transit service. BRT can either supplement or replace existing bus networks, as well as either supplement or substitute for light rail transit services. BRT offers the opportunity to expand urban and regional transit networks for less cost and in less time than rail transit alternatives. Additionally, BRT can serve as a medium-term alternative to rail transit until demand for the more expensive but higher capacity mode is proven. There are many versions of BRT deployment, but best practices include: install bus rapid transit on dedicated bus lanes with traffic signal preemption capabilities at intersections, distinctive vehicles, enhanced bus stop amenities, wider stop spacing than convention urban bus transit, platform-level boarding, and unique branding. BRT corridors need to be evaluated carefully with attention to population and employment density and growth forecasts, right of way availability, ridership and cost compared to transit modal alternatives, and ease or difficulty in implementation. Successful BRT lines and networks build transit mode share by offering a time-competitive alternative to the private motor vehicle.

Topics covered

  • Definition, attributes, and history of BRT
  • BRT benefits and costs
  • Varieties of BRT deployment
  • BRT vehicles
  • BRT stop amenities
  • Marketing BRT
  • BRT corridor and system planning
  • Optimal BRT

What you will learn

Students will acquire BRT planning and design capability. They will learn how to design a BRT line and network, select BRT vehicles and stop amenities, BRT branding and marketing, and integrating BRT with other transit modes. Students will also increase their understanding of the interdisciplinary collaboration essential in creating a successful BRT line or system.

Who should attend

The course is intended for planning staff in local, regional, and state agencies, as well as consultants. Community planners, public transit planners, transportation planners, traffic engineers, urban designers, land developers, and decision-makers will all find the course useful. The course is appropriate for both the urban and the suburban perspectives.

TE-01 Fundamentals of Traffic Engineering

Description

This course has provided California's traffic engineers and planners with core training for more than three decades. Contents are regularly updated to reflect current practices and new issues. The course spans the full range of key areas from characteristics of the transportation system, analysis of flow and capacity, traffic operations, traffic control devices, pedestrian/bicycle facilities, to traffic safety and Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). The course is taught by a team of expert practicing engineers and academics.

Topics covered

  • principles of traffic engineering
  • traffic stream characteristics
  • speed, volume, travel time, delay studies
  • roadway design
  • traffic control devices
  • signing, markings, roadside delineation
  • traffic and freeway operations
  • congestion management
  • capacity analysis
  • lighting
  • pedestrian and bicycle facilities
  • neighborhood traffic management
  • traffic safety analysis and practices
  • intersection and speed control
  • parking studies
  • traffic impact studies
  • introduction to advanced traffic management systems

Who should attend

Students gain a solid, comprehensive understanding of the basic vocabulary, principles, and working concepts of all major areas of traffic engineering as they are practiced today. Students are also introduced to the essential traffic engineering tool kit used to analyze roadway and traffic operations and to develop projects.

Who Should Attend

This course benefits engineers, planners, and technicians who are new to traffic engineering principles and practices. It should be viewed as the introductory course for other advanced classes on focused topics in traffic engineering.

TE-02 Traffic Signal Design: Engineering Concepts

Description

This newly updated course covers basic concepts, standards, and practices related to the design and installation of traffic signals. Within the framework of the California Vehicle Code, California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CA MUTCD), and Chapter 9 on Highway Lighting from Caltrans Traffic Manual, this course will explore the relationship among various engineering disciplines as foundations for signal design; introduce signal phasing diagrams, signal controllers and cabinets; explain the layouts of signal heads, signal poles, conductor schedule, and associated signal conduits, pullboxes, wiring, interconnects, detection and safety lighting. The course includes lectures, sample problems, and exercise projects that will familiarize the course participant with the design process for a simple signal design plan, and to provide for a unit-price-based cost estimate. While this course will focus only on the introductory engineering aspects in signal design and introduce some local agencies' equivalent standards and specifications that vary from Caltrans, the goal is for the course participants to become familiar with standards and specifications that guide the design and lead to successful project delivery of an operational traffic signal.

Topics covered

  • relationship of street designs and signal designs
  • signal phasing, controllers, cabinets
  • signal phasing
  • signal heads, poles, conduits, pullboxes, detection
  • intersection safety lighting
  • the format of contract documents

What you will learn

Students gain a good working understanding of concepts and standards needed to develop plans for traffic signal installations, including step-by-step procedures.

Who should Attend

This is an introductory course targeted for traffic engineers, technicians, and maintenance and construction personnel with little or no experience in how to plan for and install traffic signals.

Requirements

Please bring the following tools to the course: pocket calculator, engineer's scale (with 1:20 scale), 12" straight edge, and four colored pencils (red, green, blue, black). Optional item is a template with circles, squares and rectangles. The perspective course participants will be exposed to Caltrans Standard Plans and Specifications, and are encouraged to review them online at http://www.dot.ca.gov/hq/esc/oe/construction_standards.html.

TE-04 Traffic Signal Operations: Isolated Intersections

Description

This course covers the concepts, practical applications, and operations of isolated traffic signals. The course engages students through hands-on exercises and real-world examples of signal timing and operations. Class exercises and demonstrations are taught in a computer lab. A basic knowledge of EXCEL is needed to complete the exercises.

NOTE: This is an introductory course in a series of courses on traffic signal operations offered by the Technology Transfer Program. It is strongly recommended that students complete this course before taking either Traffic Signal Operations: Coordination for Corridors (TE-10) or Synchro and SimTraffic (TE-13). It is also helpful for students to complete this course before taking Type 170 & 2070 Traffic Signal Controllers (TE-25).

What this class is not:

  • You will not learn how to coordinate signals, this is covered in TE-10.
  • We will not teach you to use Synchro, this is covered in TE-13.
  • You will not learn how to program controllers and equipment - only partial instruction on timing sheets and detector settings, etc., this is covered in TE-25.
  • You will not learn how to design signals, only how to define specifications like detector setbacks, turn lane lengths, etc. Traffic signal design is covered in TE-02and TE-41.

For other Tech Transfer courses for the above topics beyond this course, please see Traffic Signals.

Topics covered

  • types of traffic signals
  • principles of signal timing
  • timing of fixed and actuated signals
  • pedestrian considerations
  • introduction to signal coordination
  • detector logic
  • gap settings
  • recall and other features
  • signal timing using Excel Spreadsheet (PlanSig)
  • when to change timing settings
  • Synchro input
  • learn to understand Synchro output (PlanSig results will be compared to Synchro output for one of the in-class problems)
  • hands-on problems and filling timing sheets

Who should attend

The class is for traffic engineers, planners, consultants, and technicians who are new to traffic signal timing. Experienced practitioners who desire a "refresher" course might also benefit from this course.

TE-06 California MUTCD Update Workshop

Description

  • Are you aware that California adopted a new CA MUTCD standard (CA MUTCD 2018 Revision 3) in March, 2018. This affects how you do your daily work in transportation because it updates or changes the State's traffic control requirements?
  • Are you aware of your company or public agency's requirements to follow this document related to transportation projects?
  • Are you wondering how the prior Caltrans Traffic Manual, the California Supplement to the MUTCD, and the most recent Federal MUTCD all relate to each other and to your work?
  • Do you know the status of some of the more significant changes to the CA MUTCD, such as signal timing parameters, pedestrian and bicycle traffic controls, traffic signs, and speed zones apply?
  • Would you like to find out how other California practitioners are applying these new standards and guidelines successfully? Would you like to benefit from their real-world, transportation experience in both the public and private sides of the industry, and be able to apply their "lessons learned" to your projects spanning traffic control devices, signage, traffic signals, school zones, pavement markings, and the latest requirements and guidance for these?
  • Do you want to hear about some of the changes that have been approved for 2018 and some changes that may occur in the future?

If so, you will want to attend this important workshop, which emphasizes application areas of the new CA MUTCD. Learn where your prior California Supplement/Traffic Manual applications still apply or have become outdated. Fully understand where and how California practice differs from Federal practice to be in compliance. Pick-up wide-ranging good practices in applying these standards to new and existing transportation facilities in California. The workshop is a combination of presentations by experts, discussion, and Q&A, so whether you are a seasoned practitioner or completely new to the field, bring your issues and experience to further your knowledge.

Topics covered

  • Changes in bridge design specifications relative to existing specifications
  • LRFD design approach
  • limit states (serviceability, strength, extreme condition, and fatigue & fracture limit states)
  • permanent and live loading
  • live load distribution
  • structure analysis
  • concrete design (flexure, shear, strut and tie models)
  • pre-stressed concrete
  • design problems and examples

Who should attend

This one-day workshop will benefit traffic engineers, planners, and technicians who work in the various facets of traffic engineering. The workshop will also benefit other individuals who wish to learn about practical applications of the CA MUTCD to traffic engineering practice. Individuals with or without prior knowledge of the CA MUTCD will benefit.

What you will learn

Attendees will gain practical skills on how to use and apply the MUTCD and the California MUTCD to their traffic engineering work, with emphasis on application areas that often pose difficulties for practitioners, including: all-way stops; speed zoning; traffic signal operations; school area traffic controls; and where California practice differs significantly from Federal practice. Attendees will learn good practices and lessons learned in applying the MUTCD and California Supplement to both new and existing transportation facilities in California. Attendees are encouraged to bring issues/experience at work for discussion at the workshop.

TE-10 Traffic Signal Operations: Coordination for Corridors

Description

This two-day course will focus on topics related to coordinating/synchronizing traffic signals along the corridors. This course will enable you to develop and evaluate the performance of two types of traffic signal coordination -- time of day and traffic responsive systems. For time of day and traffic responsive coordinated systems, attendees will learn how to determine good timing and coordinated solutions with innovative approaches for managing vehicle queues, progressing turns, and addressing potential gridlock situations, how to find optimal timing solutions, and how to safely accommodate non-motorists. Students will work on signal timing plans for several signals along arterials including freeway interchange signals; assess whether more complex timing solutions offer operational improvements; solve specialized problems such as offset intersections and diamond interchanges; and learn to perform analysis and evaluation of traffic volumes and field checks. The operational concept for traffic adaptive systems will be introduced. A basic knowledge of Synchro is helpful.

Topics covered

  • Overview of in-place recycling and it's benefits over traditional "remove-and-replace" rehabilitation strategies
  • Project assessment
  • Selecting the most appropriate in-place recycling approach based on the project assessment
  • Selecting a stabilization strategy
  • Mix design
  • Pavement design
  • Key construction issues and project specification considerations
  • Case studies, good and bad

What you will learn

Students learn to plan major signal coordination projects, when to use the different types of timing strategy (time of day, traffic responsive, traffic adaptive), how to proceed from data collection to satisfactory system operation and fine-tuning, and how to update signal coordination plans as traffic conditions change over time. Traffic adaptive software, a key to many "intelligent" traffic management systems, will be introduced.

Who should attend

This course is designed for traffic engineers from public agencies and consulting firms who already have some experience in signal coordination work, or who have completed prerequisite courses equivalent to Traffic Signal Operations: Isolated Intersections (TE-04) and Synchro and SimTraffic (TE-13).

TE-11 Access Management and Site Design

Description

How and where vehicles enter and leave the roadway strongly affect traffic safety and traffic operations on the site itself, in the street, and through nearby intersections. This course focuses on good practices for effective management of the many different types of access between the roadway and a specific site, including commercial, residential, and office sites. It provides a sound technical foundation for engineers and planners whose work involves designing or reviewing issues or on-site circulation plans.

Topics covered

  • effective access, driveway, and intersection design
  • drop-off/pick-up areas
  • safe design of conflict points and areas
  • drive-thru facilities
  • queuing area and parking lot design
  • truck and transit access design
  • internal street configurations and controls
  • enhanced pedestrian and bicycle mobility and safety
  • emergency access
  • access management policies and practices
  • traffic mitigation fee programs and agreements
  • traffic thresholds and problem mitigation strategies
  • site plan and traffic impact studies for new development projects

What you will learn

Students learn how to design and manage safe, efficient means to move traffic on, off, and around various types of business, commercial, and residential developments. Students also learn how to prepare and use traffic impact studies for new developments.

Who should attend

This course is designed for city and county engineers as well as transportation and traffic planners and community planners who are involved with some aspect of local access design and management, including the design or review of traffic circulation plans and traffic impact studies, and/or local review of development projects. Experienced professionals will benefit from the focus on state-of-the-practice tools and techniques. No previous knowledge of access management is required for the course.

TE-13 SYNCHRO and SimTraffic

Description

This two-day course provides beginning to intermediate computer lab training in SYNCHRO / SimTraffic10 software and the recently published 2016 Highway Capacity Manual (HCM 2016) for vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclists. Working on a real-world project, students will use SYNCHRO to insert an aerial background, add / modify roadways, input intersection geometrics, enter multi-modal traffic volumes (cars, trucks, peds, and bicycles) and signal timings to perform capacity analysis for signalized, unsignalized and roundabout intersections. In addition, students will use Synchro 10 to evaluate and develop optimal signal timing plans that reduce delays, congestion, and fuel consumption, and develop physical mitigation measures to mitigate oversaturated levels of service. The seamless integration of Synchro with SimTraffic, a microsimulation software, will be used to evaluate intersection operations and compare the differences between "isolated - macro-level" Synchro and "network-wide - micro-level" SimTraffic analysis. This course will also teach you how to review and understand the delay, level of service, and queuing analysis using both empirical analysis (Synchro) and micro-simulation (SimTraffic).

Topics covered

  • Detailed review of Synchro 10 input requirements
  • Analysis of signalized, unsignalized and roundabout intersections using Synchro 10
  • Multi-modal vehicle, pedestrian and bicycle LOS using HCM 2010
  • Optimizing signal timings for a group of intersections
  • Integration of SYNCHRO 10 with SimTraffic
  • Network-wide analysis and optimization using SimTraffic

What you will learn

Using a real-world project in a computer lab class setting, students will learn how to develop a network and use the SYNCHRO 10 and SimTraffic 10 software. This includes inserting an aerial background, add / modify straight and curved roadways, inputting intersection geometrics and pocket lengths, entering multi-modal volumes (cars, trucks, peds, and bicyclists) and signal timings to perform capacity analysis for signalized, unsignalized and roundabout intersections.

Who should attend

This course is designed for traffic engineers, planners, and technicians in both public agencies and private firms who are involved in the planning, design, operation and management of signal systems.

TE-24 Traffic Signal Diagnostics and Maintenance

Description

This introductory course covers the essential operational functions of traffic signals and components, starting with basic design plans and diagrams, general rules, and specifications. Participants will learn about signal cabinets and components and how they function, traffic signal detection and calibration, wiring, power, and basic diagnostic skills.

Topics covered

  • traffic signals design basics
  • design from maintenance perspective
  • inside the traffic signal cabinet
  • vehicle detection
  • wiring of traffic signal
  • service box considerations
  • troubleshooting of malfunctions
  • signal turn-on and acceptance

What you will learn

Students learn how to interpret traffic signals plans, diagnose malfunctioned signals, make better infrastructure decisions, and reduce the risk to your agency related to malfunctioned traffic signals.

Who should Attend

The class is for traffic engineers, electrical contractors, and technicians who are new to traffic signal timing. Experienced practitioners who desire a "refresher" course also benefit. Advanced practitioners with significant experience may not be appropriate for this basic course.

TE-25 Type 170 & 2070 Traffic Signal Controller

Description

This interactive course covers both similarities and differences in between the Model 170 & 2070 traffic signal controller. These rack mount controllers interface with a variety of electrical cabinet assembly styles, including the ever-popular classic, Model 332 standard. This hands-on course provides working knowledge about the capabilities, applications, and operations of these two controller types, as well as how to program signal timing plans into the controller using various local intersection software programs. The course covers all key topics ranging from controller hardware, module options, diagnostic tools, and field applications. Course instruction includes in-depth implementation issues, and to how to upgrade from NEMA TS1, TS2, or rack mount controllers. The course combines lectures with classroom exercises, case studies, and hands-on controller labs.

Topics covered

  • Hardware module & I/O differences between the Type 170 & 2070 controller platform
  • Selection criteria and specification differences unique to each platform type
  • Lessons learned from early installations, including use of diagnostic tools for each type
  • Signal timing plan strategy for both free and coordinated signal operation. Central system integration, field communications, and NTCIP standard considerations
  • Interfacing and signal timing strategies related to controller cabinet assemblies
  • Strategies and best practices related to controller maintenance & operations (M&O), and safety
  • Vehicle, pedestrian, and bicycle detection features available for each controller platform
  • Planning for a successful mixed-use environment of 170 & 2070 controllers, and their associated central control software programs
  • Advanced operations applications involving transit signal priority, mid-block pedestrian crossings, and peer-peer communications
  • Advanced applications related to high-resolution data collection requirement for signal performance measures and connected vehicle operations

What you will learn

Students gain a working knowledge of both 170 & 2070 controller operation, including how to deploy the 2070 and integrate these controllers within the agency's jurisdiction. From the controller lab, students will also learn to identify each of the various controller hardware modules, their functions, expansion features, and limitations.

Who should attend

All individuals in planning, engineering, and electrical-maintenance fields interested in gaining knowledge and proficiency of signal controllers should attend. Specifically, a need or study in the uses and operations of deploying traffic signal controllers in a field environment will benefit from this course. No prior background in traffic controllers is required, although basic knowledge of traffic signal timing is desirable. New students and returning "refresher course" professionals will benefit from the instruction related to both popular controller hardware styles.

TE-26 Roundabout Design

Description

This two-day course will provide information on how to determine where roundabouts may be a better and more feasible option than traditional intersections. The course will guide transportation practitioners through the various design aspects and processes for roundabouts at existing and new intersection locations, taking into consideration the needs of all road users (motorists, pedestrians, and bicyclists). It will cover designs of a variety of different types of roundabouts, depending on the type of road user anticipated--from high capacity multi-lane roundabouts to modern single-lane roundabouts to mini-roundabouts (typically used for traffic calming). Best practices as well as design pitfalls for roundabouts will also be covered. This is a hands-on training, and attendees will be engaged in various design related exercises.

Topics covered

  • Roundabout types and uses
  • geometric design
  • capacity analysis
  • traffic operations
  • multimodal aspects
  • safety
  • system considerations
  • accommodating the needs of pedestrians, bicyclists, emergency response vehicles and trucks
  • best practices and lessons learned from prior design experiences
  • fixing problem roundabouts

What you will learn

At the end of this course, students will understand the principles and working concepts of all major areas of roundabout, design as practiced today. Students will learn about capacity analysis, crash rate experience, right of way impacts, geometric design principles, sight distance criteria, traffic operations, system considerations, pedestrian and bicycle treatments. Workshops will be held on capacity analysis software, fixing problem roundabouts and single lane roundabouts.

Who should attend

This course will benefit transportation professionals (engineers and planners) in cities, counties, regional, and state agencies who are involved in the planning and design of roundabouts or who are considering installing roundabouts within their jurisdictions. This course is targeted to individuals with some background in the design of intersections, although such background is not a pre-requisite for attending this training.

TE-27 Traffic Flow Principles for Practitioners (online)

Description

This online training course provides fundamental and practical knowledge on traffic flows, with emphasis on how to assess and improve these flows. Attendees will learn basic assessment methods and traffic flow theories particularly for evaluating the effects of bottlenecks, as well as the application of these concepts to improve traffic conditions on street and highway networks. This course uses a combination of lectures, case-study examples, and classroom exercises to convey tools and logic for tackling traffic problems. It provides a sound technical foundation for more specialized courses such as traffic signal operations, freeway operations, and roadway capacity analysis.

Topics covered

  • Fundamental flow concepts and traffic stream properties
  • Assessment tools such as time space and queueing diagrams
  • Models for congested traffic
  • Bottleneck evaluation and capacity analysis
  • Evaluation of vehicle delays
  • Applications to traffic signals, ramp-metering, network design and network-wide congestion management

What you will learn

Attendees will gain good understanding of principles in traffic operations and how these principles can be applied to address real-world traffic problems.

Who should Attend

This course is specially tailored for engineers and planners who work in the traffic and transportation fields, with or without previous formal training/experience in traffic flow fundamentals.

TE-29 California Traffic Engineering License Exam Review (online)

Description

This twelve-session, live, online training course is intended to help traffic engineers prepare for the California Traffic Engineer exam to become a professional Traffic Engineer in California. The course includes a set of sample problems for each session with fully-developed solutions to give examinees more opportunity to hone in their test-taking skills. The twelve sessions are designed to cover the topics identified on the Traffic Engineer Examination Content Outline on the California Board for Professional Engineers, Land Surveyors, and Geologists website. It provides strategies and techniques needed to manage time and solve exam questions under pressure, and apply required manuals, handbooks and references, such as California Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CA MUTCD), Highway Capacity Manual (HCM), Caltrans Traffic Manual, ITE Trip Generation Handbook and ITE Parking Generation Handbook to solve traffic engineering problems.

Throughout the course, practice exam problems and solutions covering all three main areas of traffic engineering (i.e., planning, operations, and design) are used. The course is taught by a team of expert practicing and licensed professional engineers. We will be using our online learning management system (LMS). The LMS allows ongoing online communication with the expert instructors throughout the training.

As there are no published versions of previous California Traffic Engineer Exams, this course does not represent actual problems that could appear in the actual exam. But rather, we have included more than 100 sample problems that represent the knowledge that is expected of any entry-level transportation engineer practicing Traffic Engineering in California.

This course is intended as a review course for transportation engineers who already have the requisite education and professional experience to qualify to take the TE licensure exam in California. We assume all examinees have the appropriate knowledge of Traffic Engineering and are familiar with all the technical references required by the Board. This course will not teach the use of these references, rather it is only a review of how to apply the reference materials in solving the TE exam problems efficiently. This course is not designed to teach basic understanding of Traffic Engineering, which should be learned either in school or at work as part of one's professional experience in Traffic Engineering.

Topics covered

  • Circulation & Parking
  • Level of Service & Capacity
  • Evaluation of Traffic-Related Impacts
  • Transportation Facilities Design
  • Traffic Signals and Lighting
  • Traffic Controls
  • Bicycles, Pedestrians, and Parking
  • Traffic Flow

What you will learn

Students will learn how to prepare for the TE exam and will receive an overview of the subjects covered in the TE exam. Students will also learn techniques to solve exam questions in a short period of time while applying reference materials.

Who should attend

Transportation engineers preparing for the California Traffic Engineer (TE) licensure exam. Examinees are assumed to have the requisite education and professional experience to qualify to take the California Traffic Engineer Exam.

This online class will have a 90-minute introductory session that will include all of the class instructors. The following 10 sessions will all be 2.5 hours on consecutive Mondays & Wednesdays. The final session will be a final question-and-answer session for 90-minutes, when students can ask their questions from all of the instructors and collaborate on final exam test-taking procedures.

TE-30 Maintaining Retroreflectivity at Required Levels (road show)

Description

This course will provide agencies and/or officials with the information and tools necessary to comply with the National Sign Retroreflectivity Standard of the California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, Section 2A.09.

Topics covered

  • The basic science of sign retroreflectivity
  • How the minimum levels of sign retroreflectivity were established
  • Identifying the existing signs in the field and documenting maintenance
  • Develop of a simple plan to meet the new inspection requirements

What you will learn

Students will learn how to comply with the State and Federal Mandate on Traffic Sign Retroreflectivity.

Who should attend

  • Engineering administrators
  • Traffic Engineers
  • Sign Maintenance Management
  • Personnel responsible for funding sign maintenance

TE-32 Pedestrian Facility Design (online)

Description

Federal, state and local policies assert that pedestrian facilities are important parts of a multi-modal transportation system. Communities across California are asking for more emphasis on walkability, with facilities that are safe and comfortable for all pedestrians, including those who are disabled. Recent updates to the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices provided more option to address pedestrian safety and convenience. This new course covers principles and good practices, including how to plan, design, and operate a wide range of pedestrian-friendly facilities, including sidewalks, crosswalks, and other public spaces adjoining or intersecting the vehicular transportation system. Application of current standards and guidelines is emphasized. Case studies supplement lectures.

The course is developed to meet the training needs of persons charged with preliminary planning, development, or design of high-quality pedestrian facilities. It will also be valuable for persons responsible for planning pedestrian friendly networks, interested in learning how to deliver quality facilities, or desiring tools to remodel existing facilities to better serve user needs.

Topics covered

  • treatment options for safe pedestrian crossings, including signal options and operations
  • design guidelines & standards for pedestrian-friendly sidewalks, transit stops, and public spaces
  • integrate safe and attractive pedestrian facilities with motorized traffic, Vision Zero
  • ADA requirements, guidelines, and implementation strategies
  • formulate community design guidelines to account for pedestrians
  • integrating pedestrian basic needs and concerns into policies and planning codes
  • use of GIS tools

What you will learn

Students learn how to create a variety of pedestrian-friendly facilities while staying within federal and state standards and guidelines for safety and meeting current ADA requirements.

Trainees will gain an in-depth understanding of the design considerations that should guide the development of pedestrian master plans. Trainees will be better prepared to develop quality designs, apply design principles to inform project planning phases, and address issues that may limit effectiveness of existing facilities.

Who should attend

This course is designed for engineers, planners, and consultants with responsibility for planning, designing or constructing pedestrian facilities along streets and highways.

This course is most appropriate for persons interested in understanding how to design a facility that meets user needs, encourages additional usage and growth in walking and preserves or improves safety for all users. While the course is designed for persons who may be charged with design of pedestrian facilities, it will offer value and insight to persons who are interested in or charged with oversight of the project selection, refinement, and design process.

TE-34 Bikeway Facility and Master Planning (online)

Description

This course will orient participants within the bicycle planning discipline, familiarize them with tools and accepted practice, and connect them with essential planning, design, and policy resources. The course will cover concepts, practices, and policies employed by the most bicycle-friendly cities and useful to practitioners to transform an average city into a bike-friendly city. The course is relevant to Planning, Parks & Recreation, Public Works, and Traffic Engineering departments, as well as land use and development consultants. The course will address best practices for preparing bicycle master plans, particularly California requirements. The course will also introduce participants to the technical toolbox for planning and designing bicycle facilities.

Topics covered

  • Brief orientation to relevant Federal and California law and codes, legislation and incentives
  • Health benefits, Active Transportation / Safe Routes To Schools, Vision Zero, Environmental Justice, equity, underserved communities
  • Environmental analysis: threshold of significance
  • What makes a bicycle-friendly City? (policies and practices, model ordinances)
  • Bicycle Master Plans and Active Transportation Plans: elements and examples
  • Integration of bikeway network into multimodal transportation system / Complete Streets. School and transit commute-sheds. Interchanges and barriers. Jurisdictional boundaries
  • Network-level planning, connectivity and project development. General Plan Circulation Element. Modal priority / "Complete Corridors", impacts to other modes. Level of Traffic Stress (LTS) analysis. Traffic character - local vs. out-of-town / cut-through
  • Bikeway types and applicability: volume/speed/context, passing environment
  • Standards: traditional / Caltrans, recent additions, innovative and experimental elements. MUTCD, Interim Approvals, Experimentation, NACTO
  • Specifics of widths, markings and signage between and through intersections
  • Tools for transforming streets: cross section and "width budget", minimum vs. optimum, width reallocation, parking modifications, minor/major widening, roundabouts
  • Bikes and traffic signals: detection, green time and clearance intervals, bike signals, pedestrian hybrid beacons
  • Prioritizing, funding and programming bicycle projects
  • Pilot projects, "Tactical Urbanism", pop-up demonstrations
  • Maximizing opportunities: interdepartmental coordination, development review, CIP, traffic signal & ITS upgrades, maintenance programs
  • Liability issues related to project design and environmental review
  • Resources for further learning and practice

What you will learn

Trainees will develop basic fluency in concepts and components of bicycle facility design and planning as part of the transportation network, beginning with an introduction to relevant legislation and policy. Trainees will also develop several ways to think of bikeways in terms of components (widths, markings, signage, signals), context (urban / suburban / rural, motor traffic volume), and user preferences. They will learn about design details and considerations for each bikeway type, tools for transforming streets, and traffic signal control options to support bicycling.

Who should attend

This class is designed for transportation planners and engineers, land use planners, bicycle program coordinators, consultants, and advocates. Real estate developers may also find the course valuable to understand how to maximize the bicycling potential and minimize undesired impacts of development.

TE-36 Multimodal Level-of-Service Analysis (online)

Description

Recent legislation, as well as public sentiment, has made it imperative that transportation professionals better understand how to analyze complete streets that serve all users. This new online course provides the basics and practical applications of analysis procedures for determining level of service for pedestrians, bicyclists, bus transit users, and auto users. It emphasizes the methods that have been developed in the recently released Highway Capacity Manual update (HCM 2010), although other methods will be discussed. This course focuses on urban/suburban streets (non-freeways). Applications of analyses include improving transportation impact studies, environmental impact reports and project mitigation, new development design standards, and setting level of significance guidelines as part of the CEQA review process. Attendees will also become familiar with:

  • cross-modal impacts (when capacity or physical characteristics of one mode are changed and thereby affect another mode using the street)
  • labor saving shortcuts for data collection (because the methodology can be very "data hungry")

This course is a combination of instructor presentations and a brief overnight homework exercise to apply the techniques in the real-world. The material complements TE-05 (Traffic Operations and Highway Capacity Analysis) and students are encouraged to take both classes, although each can be taken as a stand-alone class.

Topics covered

  • the Level of Service (LOS) concept-- what it means and why do it
  • research behind the 2010 HCM
  • cross-modal impacts
  • intersection vs. street segment Issues
  • data collection shortcuts & gathering field information
  • software available
  • California statutory and General Plan requirements
  • applications to site impact studies
  • applications to new development and design standards
  • relationship to Sustainable Transportation Indicators
  • TDM/TSM applications and project mitigation
  • typical schedule and budgetary requirements
  • developing target LOS and thresholds of significance

What you will learn

Students will learn basic level of service concepts for all modes, and how to apply them to: conduct performance and level of service analysis for various types of urban streets with various levels of accommodation for different modes; determine the impacts of system improvements; and analyze operational impacts of possible changes in the allocation of street cross-section to various modes.

Who should attend

This class is intended for planners, engineers, technicians, and others who have had minimal prior experience with the applications of the HCM, although some familiarity with the HCM may be helpful. A minimal level of mathematics is required (basic algebra).

Requirements

Participants will need a basic calculator for a home problem set.

TE-37 Access Management (online)

Description

Managing the location, type and design of vehicular connections to a roadway is an important strategy in the reduction of crash rates and maintaining reliable mobility and capacity in accordance with a road's functional purpose. This course focuses on good practices for effective access management. It provides a sound technical foundation for engineers and planners whose work involves designing or reviewing site access, driveway permitting, roadway safety, roadway design, intersection and driveway spacing and network and corridor planning.

Topics covered

  • principles of Access Management
  • reasons to manage access
  • access control within functional hierarchy
  • multi-modal aspects
  • managing access is network management
  • access management plans
  • impact mitigation elements of driveway and intersection design
  • techniques that work in applied access management
  • interchange cross street access control
  • access decision making - proof of necessity
  • respecting property rights
  • frequency and spacing
  • access design for larger vehicles
  • public involvement on corridor projects
  • economic aspects
  • examples of agency programs, policies and practices

What you will learn

Students learn about access management strategies and techniques so they can locate, design and manage safe, efficient means to move traffic to and from adjoining land use. They will learn techniques to improve traffic flow and travel times with less delay and how to protect the public investment in their road system to help reduce agency capital costs.

Who should Attend

This course is designed for agency staff and consultants that are involved in the planning, engineering and maintenance of streets, roads and highways. It is also very useful for those in land use planning who are involved in any aspect of development planning and zoning, including site design, the design or review of traffic circulation plans and traffic impact studies and review of development projects. Experienced professionals will benefit from the focus on state-of-the-practice tools and techniques. No previous knowledge of access management is required for the course.

TE-38 Roundabouts: What You Need to Know (online)

Description

This online course will describe: what are roundabouts and how do they work? Why roundabouts are a viable solution to intersection control. The benefits compared to other alternatives. The research and experience that support the application of roundabouts on local, collector and arterial roads. The variety of roundabouts - why one design style does not fit all. The course will guide transportation practitioners through the various evaluation and design aspects for roundabouts taking into consideration other travel modes. It will cover designs of a variety of different types of roundabouts from high capacity multi-lane roundabouts to single-lane roundabouts to mini-roundabouts. Possible errors in the roundabout design process and how to minimize them.

Topics covered

  • benefits of roundabouts
  • roundabout types and applications
  • geometric design
  • signs and markings
  • high speed and low speed
  • capacity analysis
  • traffic operations
  • multimodal aspects
  • safety
  • system considerations
  • fixing problem roundabouts

What you will learn

At the end of this course, students will understand the principles and working concepts of all major areas of roundabout design and operation as practiced today. Students will learn about capacity analysis, crash rate experience, right of way impacts, geometric design principles, sight distance criteria, traffic operations, system considerations, pedestrian and bicycle treatments.

Who should attend

This course will benefit transportation professionals who are involved in the approval, planning, and design of intersections and who are considering installing roundabouts as an alternative to traditional intersection controls. This course is targeted to individuals with some background in the design of intersections, although such background is not a pre-requisite for attending this training.

TE-39 Roadway Lighting Design (online)

Description

This course emphasizes how to design roadway lighting installations that are effective and that meet various standards and requirements. While instruction focuses on use of the illuminance ("foot candle") method, students will also learn about the luminance method. The course covers a wide range of relevant topics, from human factors, including the eye, vision, and perception, to lighting terminology, including light control, luminaire types, and design principles, with reference to IES standard practice, the AASHTO guidelines, and FHWA's Roadway Lighting Handbook. The class combines lectures, hands-on classroom exercises, and case studies.

Topics covered

  • luminaire design
  • photometric data
  • IES luminaire classification
  • light sources and ballasts
  • switching
  • poles
  • IES Standard Practice (RP-8)
  • planning and lighting design principles
  • economics of roadway lighting, maintenance, and energy considerations

What you will learn

Students learn key skills needed to design roadway lighting installations using the illuminance method as well as guidelines/standards affecting their design.

Who should attend

The course is targeted for public agency staff or consultants with little or no experience in designing or planning roadway lighting. The class also benefits those seeking some refresher training on the current state-of-the-practice.

Required Materials

RP-8-2014 American National Standard Practice for Roadway Lighting, published by the Illuminating Engineering Society, is the required textbook for this class. Students are responsible for purchasing this textbook directly from a bookseller prior to the start of this class. 
Students who already own ‘RP 8 2000’ can use this version of the textbook in class. If you don't already own RP 8 2000 and need to purchase the book, it’s preferred that you purchase the new version RP 8 2014.

TE-41 Traffic Signal Design: Complete Streets Application

Description

This new course introduces the practical design considerations in traffic signal designs that are above and beyond the basic introductions. Within the framework of the California Vehicle Code, the California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CA MUTCD), and other national and state references with recommended practices and real-world illustrations, this course will explore the multi-modal design expectations from today's traffic signal designers in a complete-street environment.

This course will introduce complex signal phasing diagrams, typical features of controller firmware, and configuration of signal cabinets; and signal indications/heads placement and detection layout with respect to design applications for rail crossings, emergency vehicles, bus transit, bicycles, pedestrians, and cars. Additionally, this course will introduce the design concept for bus rapid transit (BRT), light rail transit (LRT) and heavy rail.

The course includes lectures, sample problems, and exercise projects that will familiarize the course participant with the design process that starts with preliminary and progress design submittals, as well as formats of design review comments and resolutions expected by typical public agencies. While this course is suitable for traffic signal designers with varying experience, this course will be introduced as a sequential next-level course to Tech Transfer's TE-02 (Traffic Signal Design: Engineering Concepts), or equivalent. The goal is for the course participants to become familiar with real-world, multi-modal, signal-design applications that accommodate various street types and intersections users.

Topics covered

  • signal phasing (review of basics)
  • complex signal phasing
  • controller firmware features and signal cabinet configurations
  • layout of signal heads and detections within Multi-Modal Contexts
  • adaptive traffic control and other "next gen" options
  • sample applications in various modes:
    • pedestrians (hybrid beacons, lead pedestrian intervals and pedestrian scrambles)
    • bicycles (Types I-III/IV bikeways)
    • transit signal priority and bus rapid transits
    • emergency vehicles (fire station and en-route), rail crossings (typical, pre-signal, queue-cutter)
    • light rail transit

What you will learn

Students gain a good working understanding of concepts and engineering practices needed to develop plans for traffic signal installations within a multi-modal context.

Who should attend

This is a next-level sequential course targeted for traffic engineers, technicians, and maintenance and construction personnel with adequate traffic signal design experience or prior training equivalent to Tech Transfer's TE-02 (Traffic Signal Design: Engineering Concepts) course.

Requirements

Please bring the following tools to the course: pocket calculator, engineer's scale (with 1:20 scale), 12" straight edge, and four colored pencils (red, green, blue, black). Optional item is a template with circles, squares and rectangles. The perspective course participants will be exposed to Caltrans Standard Plans and Specifications, and are encouraged to review them online at  http://www.dot.ca.gov/hq/esc/oe/construction_standards.html

TE-42 Multimodal Transportation Impact Analysis

Description

Recent California legislation, as well as public sentiment, has made it imperative that transportation professionals better understand how to analyze and interpret performance measures related to complete streets and sustainable transportation. This new course provides the basics and practical applications for determining level of service for pedestrians, bicyclists, bus transit users, and auto users. It also provides information on the evolving changes in CEQA (SB 743- Steinberg) that requires determining the vehicle miles of travel (VMT) generated by proposed land development and transportation projects, and the determination of what constitutes a significant impact under the new law (including safety impacts).

The course emphasizes the use of the latest Highway Capacity Manual 6th edition (HCM6, released in 2016), the Institute of Transportation Engineer's (ITE) new Trip Generation Handbook 3rd edition, and other methods, and the latest state rules. 

This course focuses on urban/suburban streets (non-freeways), with equal emphasis on responsibilities normally under Caltrans' or local agency control. Applications of analyses include improving transportation project design, preparation of defensible environmental impact reports and project mitigation, and prioritizing facilities for improvement. 

This course combines instructor presentations with interactive engagements to apply the techniques in the real-world, with case studies and applications of the material. 

Attendees will also become familiar with:

  • Cross-modal impacts (when capacity or physical characteristics of one mode are changed and thereby affect another mode using the street)
  • Labor-saving shortcuts for data collection (because some multi-modal level of service methodologies can be very "data hungry")
  • How 'induced travel demand' is defined, and when it does (or does not) create a significant environmental impact under the law
  • Determining what causes a potentially significant safety impact

Topics covered

  • the Level of Service (LOS) concept-- what it means and why do it, pros and cons of different methods
  • research behind the newest HCM, released late in 2016
  • cross-modal impacts
  • how to calculate VMT from a proposed project
  • gathering field information & data collection shortcuts
  • software available to assist in analysis
  • California statutory requirements (especially CEQA and SB 743)
  • relationship to the latest Caltrans Highway Design Manual
  • applications to Context Sensitive Design
  • assessing safety impacts of projects
  • relationship to Sustainable Transportation Indicators
  • incorporation as part of project mitigation
  • developing target LOS and thresholds of significance
  • typical schedule and budgetary requirements
  • measuring environmental justice impact
  • increasing transit as a share of regional VMT
  • applying analytical and simulation tools to multi-modal impact analysis

What you will learn

Students will learn basic level-of-service (LOS) concepts for all modes, and how to apply them to conduct performance and level-of-service analysis for various types of urban streets with various levels of accommodation for different modes; determine the impacts of system improvements using vehicle miles traveled (VMT); and analyze operational impacts of possible changes in the allocation of street cross-section to various modes.

Who should attend

Planners, engineers, technicians, and others at all levels of experience, including those who have had minimal prior experience with the HCM can benefit from this class, although some familiarity with the HCM is desirable. A minimal level of mathematics is required (basic algebra).

Requirements

Participants will need a basic calculator for several in-class problem sets. A complete set of Course Notes (i.e., printed overhead slides) will be provided by the instructors.

Suggested Pre-Course Reading Assignments

All training participants should familiarize themselves, if possible, with the following important documents before the class to prepare themselves adequately for this focused training (at least by quickly reviewing them):

TE-43 Multimodal Transportation Operations: Evaluation Methods & Performance Measures (online)

Description

This new online training course provides the fundamentals required to understand, perform, and interpret the results from multimodal operational analysis and performance evaluations. Several of the most commonly used evaluation and analysis methods are presented with real-world examples. The course focuses on how to develop an appropriate set of performance measures to reliably compute the gains in performance to the transportation system (and/or subsystems) attributable to a project, policy, or program of interest. It also covers the data sources and data reliability, analytic (evaluation) methods and their strengths and limitations, and the overall reliability of the analytical results. 

Topics covered

  • Understanding the scope, scale and focus of your program's needs and the evaluation process
    • What decision processes are driving the need for the performance evaluations?
    • What are the resulting performance measured being used for?
  • Selecting appropriate performance measures, and evaluation methods
  • Overview of the various analytical and empirical techniques for transportation system performance evaluations & monitoring programs
  • Potential data sources: inputs to the analysis process
  • Reliability of analytic methods, empirical methods, and the data we use as inputs
  • Combining empirical & analytical procedures for better results
  • How to choose data sources & evaluation methods for your particular project needs
  • Analytical and Simulation Software Tools - Tool types, criteria for selection, and performance measures (with examples)
  • Analysis techniques & data sources - how to choose best data & methods for your particular project needs

What you will learn

Attendees will learn about the various analytic methods that can be used to measure the performance of transportation systems and isolated system elements (like freeway segments and signalized intersections). Attendees will also learn which performance measures are best suited for different analysis purposes - why we choose the performance measures we do for a particular project. Upon completion of the course, they will be able to gauge the reliability of the performance estimation process, the underlying inputs and the resulting (calculated) performance measures. This course uses a combination of lectures, case-study examples, and classroom exercises to convey tools and logic for tackling traffic problems. It provides a sound technical foundation for additional specialized courses such as traffic signal operations, freeway operations, and roadway capacity analysis.

Who should Attend

This course is intended for transportation planners, transportation engineers and technicians at local, regional, and state agencies, as well as transportation planning consultants. Both new and experienced planners and engineers will benefit from this course. It will also benefit board members, managers, and others involved with developing, reviewing and/or approving transportation performance monitoring programs, corridor improvement plans, or transportation system performance evaluation efforts.

TE-51 Adaptive Traffic Control Systems (online)

Description

This new online course offers summary of fundamental principles, operational requirements and expected benefits of some of the frequently deployed Adaptive Traffic Control Systems. The first session presents differences between adaptive and responsive traffic controls and introduces briefly three ATCS deployed in California (ACS Lite, QuicTrac, and SCOOT). The second session addresses InSync, a system with the highest growth in number of deployments over the last few years. The third session presents SynchroGreen, adaptive version of traffic signal software from one of the most respected traffic signal software developers in the US. Finally, the fourth session focuses on SCATS, one of the oldest and widely deployed systems in the entire world. Each session is divided into three major parts: First offers summary of fundamental principles of a selected adaptive technology, second covers summary of operational and institutional requirements to run adaptive control, and the third presents recent case studies with a glimpse on the operational benefits.

Topics covered

  • Fundamental principles of ATCS operations
  • Adjustment of signal timings and operational flexibility
  • Detection requirements
  • Communication requirements
  • Software and hardware requirements
  • Failsafe operational modes
  • Institutional preparation for deployment of an ATCS
  • Expected operational benefits
  • Example of case studies in field and/or simulation

What you will learn

Students will obtain a significant amount of technical information to understand fundamental principles of operations, deployment requirements, and expected operational benefits (highlighted through exemplary case studies) of some of the frequently deployed Adaptive Traffic Control Systems. This information will help students to become familiar with these relatively new signal control technologies and develop a realistic set of expectations regarding their deployments and operational benefits.

Who should attend

This course is intended for traffic engineers, planners, technicians, and decision makers in municipal, county, and state agencies interested in the operations, requirements and benefits of Adaptive Traffic Control System technologies, particularly those with the responsibility for the planning, design, implementation, operation, and maintenance of traffic signal control systems for urban areas.

TE-52 Bikeway Facility Design and Safety Improvement (online)

Description

This new, in-depth class on design of facilities for bicycling addresses both legacy facilities and innovative designs that are being developed within many communities at this time. This course will orient participants with fundamentals and details of bikeway design, ranging from application of traditional designs (bike routes, lanes, paths) to innovative facilities that are growing in popularity, such as separated/protected bikeways and special shared treatments. The course will cover a wide range of subjects ranging from user types and preferences, operator characteristics, to detailed design approaches. The course includes numerous examples of legacy and innovative facilities, including examples from European cities that experience extremely high bicycle usage for all ages and abilities.

The course is developed to meet the training needs of persons charged with preliminary planning, development, or design of high-quality bikeway facilities. It will also be valuable for persons responsible for planning bicycle friendly networks, interested in learning how to deliver quality facilities, or desiring tools to remodel existing facilities to better serve user needs.

Topics covered

  • User criteria to establish design approach
  • Characteristics of the wide range of bikeway users
  • California laws that regulate bikeway design considerations
  • Recent changes to standards and guidelines
  • Liability issues related to project design and environmental review
  • Detailed design considerations for bicycle facilities
  • Traditional bikeway facilities
  • Innovative bikeway facilities
  • International treatments
  • End-of-trip Facilities
  • Case studies

What you will learn

Trainees will gain an in-depth understanding of the design considerations that should guide the development of bikeways that consider safety, provide attractiveness and comfort for new users, and encourage increasing bicycle usage. Trainees will be better prepared to develop quality designs, apply design principles to inform project planning phases, and address issues that may limit effectiveness of existing facilities. While the course is designed for persons who may be charged with design of bicycling facilities, it will offer value and insight to persons who are interested in or charged with oversight of the project selection, refinement, and design process.

Who should attend

This course is most appropriate for persons interested in understanding how to design a facility that meets user needs, encourages additional usage and growth in bicycling, and preserves or improves safety for all users. While appropriate and intended for designers, bikeway planners and other professionals will find value in learning principles of how to design for safety, to encourage new users, and to retrofit existing facilities that do not meet user expectations. This class is primarily designed for transportation engineers who are charged with bikeway design and safety. However, it may be valuable and interesting for planners, bicycle program coordinators, and advocates who are interested in helping to see better facilities for their communities.

TE-60 VMT Metrics Policy Application & Technical Analysis for SB 743 Compliance

Description

The course will examine the origins of changing the transportation metric from level of service (LOS) to vehicle-miles-of-travel (VMT). We will discuss VMT and its relationship to climate change impacts; the legislative history of VMT in California, including Senate Bills (SBs) 375 and 743; and an overview of the new CEQA Guidelines update. We will also discuss means by which local agencies can continue to address the issue of traffic congestion outside of the CEQA process.

OPR has selected vehicle-miles-of-travel VMT as the preferred metric to comply with SB 743. The recommended changes to the CEQA Guidelines include a Technical Advisory that provides recommendations about VMT screening, methodology, and thresholds. These recommendations require fundamental changes in current transportation impact analysis practices and have implications for transportation planning as part of general plans and regional transportation plans. This course will explain the technical details of how to address these changes and include detailed step-by-step flow-chart explanations of how to analyze land use projects, transportation projects, land use plans (e.g., general plans), and regional transportation plans under SB 743.

Topics covered

  • What is vehicle miles travelled (VMT)?
  • VMT and its relationship to greenhouse gas emissions
  • The legislative evolution of VMT
    • SB 375 - Sustainable Communities Strategy
    • SB 743 - mandate to update the CEQA Guidelines
  • The CEQA Guidelines
    • Role of the Guidelines
    • OPR's task to update the CEQA Guidelines
    • The underlying philosophy - encourage infill, discourage sprawl
    • What the CEQA Guidelines say
    • OPR's technical advisory
  • Is LOS still a thing?
    • Exception for "roadway capacity projects"
    • Local development standards to limit congestion take the place of CEQA mitigation
    • Local traffic impact ordinances can live on
  • Role of VMT in environmental impact analysis versus transportation planning
  • VMT estimation and forecasting methods
    • Data and models
    • Project versus cumulative analysis
    • Differences in methods for energy, air quality, GHG, and transportation impacts
    • Induced Travel
  • Role of the ARB's Mobile Source Strategy in establishing substantial evidence for significance thresholds
  • Role of RTPs and general plans in setting significance thresholds
  • Mitigation sources, strategies, and limitations

What you will learn

This class will provide attendees with a background of CEQA's VMT traffic metric, including an understanding of the origins of the new traffic metric; a discussion of the new CEQA Guidelines provisions on VMT, including an introduction to the OPR technical advisory; and suggestions on how local agencies can adapt so that concerns about congestion and traffic impact fee programs can be addressed outside of CEQA. Students will obtain a rich set of practical information to help them navigate SB 743 compliance.
This will include how to estimate and forecast VMT using a variety of methods and what limitations apply; how to relate VMT reduction goals across technical topic areas including energy, air quality, greenhouse gases, and transportation; how to select the form of VMT that is most useful in measuring transportation impacts; how to select appropriate thresholds; and what constitutes substantial evidence to support these decisions.

Who should attend

This course is intended for planners, engineers, policy analysts, and CEQA practitioners, among others, in private or public practice who want to understand the technical details associated with SB 743 implementation and the fundamental changes in current transportation impact analysis practices. It will also provide a foundational understanding of the origins and underlying philosophy behind California's new VMT traffic metric.

TE-54 Commercial Development Site Design and Traffic Impact Analysis (online)

Description

This new online course is about examining the key components that result in effective internal circulation for commercial land development projects. The course will also focus on why earlier designs have failed to provide good circulation and the resulting impacts on the tenants of shopping centers and business parks. It will discuss the problem of designing commercial development projects for safe access and minimizing traffic impacts on the neighboring roads. It will also discuss the preparation of traffic impact studies for new development projects to make sure impacts are properly addressed and cases studies of projects where studies failed to do so.

Topics covered

This course focuses on what is most important about design access and circulation for commercial development projects such as driveways, parking lot layout, connectivity to adjacent developments, the most critical design parameters, making sure the needs of all road users are met, and the safety of everyone accessing these types of development projects is fully addressed. The course will also discuss what needs to be included in traffic impact studies, the best sources of information, and structuring of the scope of work ahead of studies being prepared so that all impacts are fully analyzed, disclosed, and potentially mitigated.

What you will learn

The following learning outcomes have been established for training participants:

  • Improved understanding of parking-lot layouts and internal circulation
  • How to manage the interaction between on-site circulation and traffic flow on streets adjacent to proposed projects
  • At least ten publications will be identified that provide the best technical information

Who should attend

This course is intended for traffic engineers, transportation planners, architects, and representatives of developers who regularly have to interact with public agencies regarding the land use entitlement process.

TS-03 Roadside Safety and Guardrail Systems (road show)

Description

This one-day course offers students an opportunity to learn how to design more "forgiving" roadways-those that minimize hazardous installations and reduce potential for death, injury, and property damage associated with crashes. Instruction focuses on best practices in the design and evaluation of common roadside structures such as guardrails, concrete barriers, signs, light pole supports, and work-zone devices. This course is based on the AASHTO Roadside Design Guide, Caltrans Standard Plans, and the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 350: Recommended Procedures for the Safety Performance Evaluation of Roadside Features. Video presentations illustrate various safety devices and impact attenuators, to help students understand the dynamics of roadside crashes.

Topics covered

  • identification of potential hazards
  • design of guardrails, concrete barriers, and impact attenuators
  • new requirements for guardrail end terminals
  • NCHRP crash test results for barrier systems
  • break-away sign and lighting supports
  • traversable drainage facilities

What you will learn

Students learn how to recognize, evaluate and resolve potentially hazardous situations involving common roadside structures. Students also learn how to design, install, and maintain new devices to mitigate or avoid these hazards, and how to identify conditions that could make some safety features less effective than expected.

Who should attend

This class is intended for engineers, planners, and managers with responsibilities for safety management and traffic problem analysis.

TS-04 Improving Safety at Intersections (online)

Description

About 65 percent of all crashes in urban areas and 40 percent of those in rural areas occur at or near intersections or driveways. Safety improvements at these locations have always been a priority and pose a challenge for most transportation agencies in California. Because crashes are typically complex events, a great diversity of mitigation measures have been tried with varying degrees of success, including the modern round-about. This workshop offers a range of guidelines, solutions, and strategies for reducing conflicts and crashes at intersection locations. Safety improvements appropriate for both urban and rural areas are explored.

Topics covered

  • Why Intersection Management is Important
  • Safety Aspects of Signalized Intersections
  • Reducing Collisions at High Crash Signalized Intersections
  • The Modern Roundabout as a Signal Alternative
  • Safety of Non-Signalized Intersections
  • Innovative Designs for Improving Intersection Safety and Capacity
  • Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety at Signalized Intersections
  • Sources of intersection conflict and collisions
  • Good practices at signalized and non-signalized intersections
  • Land use designs to reduce collisions
  • Good access management practices

What you will learn

Students will obtain a rich set of information to help them select appropriate safety improvement options and make better decisions about how to reduce collisions at all types of intersections.

Who should Attend

This course is intended for planners, engineers, and public safety personnel in municipal, county, and state agencies with responsibility for reducing traffic collisions.

TS-51 Improving Safety of Railroad Crossings & Light Rail Systems (online)

Description

This new online course takes a look at recent studies on how to improve safety at railroad highway crossings and reduce vehicle-train collisions. The first session will also focus on motorized users, as well as pedestrians and bicyclists who have to cross railroad highway crossings on a regular basis. Information will be shared from recent publications including the Railroad-Highway Grade Crossing Handbook and conferences on railroad corridors where speakers addressed railroad crossing safety and discussed some of the topics listed in the course outline. The second session will focus on light rail systems and their impacts on the operation of streets that they have to cross or share with other motorized traffic. The course will address how best to blend motorized and train traffic as well as handle pedestrians that cross light rail tracks on a regular basis so as to minimize conflicts and collisions.

Topics covered

  • Driver behavior at railroad crossings
  • Conducting railroad crossings diagnostics
  • Treatments for reducing crashes at railroad crossings
  • Railroad preemption sequence and timing of traffic signals
  • Design of pedestrian and bicycle crossings across train tracks
  • Recent railroad highway crossing requirements of the CA MUTCD
  • Examples of light rail alignments and configurations
  • Pros and cons of the various light rail alignment and configuration options
  • Light rail station location, access, and other considerations
  • Impact of light rail on street operations and crash patterns
  • Treatments for pedestrian and bicycle crossings in light rail systems

What you will learn

Students will obtain a rich source of technical information to help them select appropriate safety improvement options and make better decisions about how to reduce collisions at railroad-highway grade crossings and light rail systems that operate on public streets in non-exclusive rights of way.

Who should Attend

This course is intended for planners, engineers, and public safety personnel in municipal, county, and state agencies with responsibility for the design and operation of traffic control devices at or near railroad highway crossings as well as light rail systems that operate on public streets which are shared with other road users. Certified planners who need AICP CM credits will be awarded 4.0 credits for this online training course.